Information contained on this page is current as of the date of publication (June 9, 2016). Changes may be made to policies, curriculum, academic programs, personnel, fees, and academic calendar without notice. See the current Student Handbook and Catalog, and addenda, for reference.

All courses in this listing follow a standard format:

Course Name (Abbreviation ###q) Number of credit hours
Prerequisite (if any), co-requisite (if any)
Description of the course content.

In the course number, the first number denotes the level of the course (100-200 is lower division, 300-400 is upper division, 500+ is graduate level), the second number denotes the number of credits the course is worth, the third number denotes the course placement within a sequence, and the “q” indicates quarter credits.

Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are currently open only to enrolled Midwifery Program students. For course availability, please refer to the current term’s registration materials.

Course Offerings

Advanced Breastfeeding Theory (BRF212q) 1 credit hour

This course replaces Breastfeeding III (BRF213q).
Prerequisite: Introduction to Breastfeeding Theory (BRF131q)
Case studies and development of protocols deepen students’ knowledge of breastfeeding counseling. Students focus on more complex situations including failure to thrive and infant hypoglycemia. Students are also introduced to some of the professional issues involved in practicing as an IBCLC.

Advanced Lactation Case Studies (ACS221q) 2 credit hours

Advanced Lactation Case Studies (ACS221q) 2 credit hours
Prerequisite: All Lactation Program coursework complete or in progress.
Students will have an opportunity to create their own cases to present to their peers, as well as solving differential diagnosis scenarios. Includes all pieces of the consultant’s practice such as history taking, assessment, charting, plan development, and follow-up.

Advanced Lactation Skills (ALS221q) 2 credit hours

Prerequisite: Breastfeeding Skills (BFS211q)
This course will prepare students to: perform a thorough lactation-related assessment of the mother and infant; utilize lactation devices; and use critical thinking for differential diagnosis, and proper implementation of tools and care plan formation. This course utilizes a variety of learning methods including: reading, lectures, role play, case studies, writing, student presentations, multimedia, demonstration with models, and clinical practice.

Anatomy and Physiology for Birth and Lactation Professionals (ANT151q) 5 credit hours

Using lecture, weekly exams, and student presentations, this course covers all the major body systems with an emphasis on knowledge relevant to perinatal practices. Beginning with basic cellular function and a brief review of A&P vocabulary, students will progress rapidly through each body system, focusing on how the body functions in wellness, but also addressing some pathologies. This course meets Midwifery Program prerequisite requirements.

Antepartum* (ANT251q) 5 credit hours

Co-requisite: Physical Assessment I (PHY221q)
Using lecture, discussion, and audiovisual aids, this course covers pregnancy signs and symptoms, fetal development and environment, evaluating health, Biodynamic counseling techniques, the impact of nutrition on pregnancy physiology, eclampsia including toxemia, UTI, and bleeding in early pregnancy.

Applied Microbiology for Midwives (AMM351q) 5 credit hours

Co-requisite: Microbiology Skills (MIC311q).
Using lecture, discussion, and student presentations, this course provides an overview of microbiology principles and basic immunology. Students will also learn about significant infectious diseases (including sexually transmitted infections) and their causative microorganisms, risk factors, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment, as well as impact on mother, fetus, and newborn. Diseases covered include but are not limited to: candida, cytomegalovirus, syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, herpes simplex, HPV, HIV, hepatitis, staph, strep, varicella, TB, tetanus, Listeria, Pertussis, and toxoplasmosis.

Birth Stories in Life and Literature (BST211q) 1 credit hour

Read, write and tell birth stories while learning and exploring effective storytelling techniques. This course helps develop skills that are useful for educating clients, for processing birth experiences and for use in the peer review setting.

Botanicals I (BOT231q) 3 credit hours

This course sets the theoretical foundation for herbal medicine therapies and covers materia medica and herbal therapeutics of well-woman herbs, herbs for infants and children, and lactation. Students will be able to identify key actions and constituents for a wide array of plants, as well as contraindications for the childbearing year. We highly recommend that you complete our Introduction to Healing Systems course before taking Botanicals I.

Botanicals II (BOT332q) 3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Botanicals I (BOT231q)
This course uses the knowledge gained in Botanicals I on actions and constituents to discuss materia medica and herbal therapeutics for fertility, preconception, pregnancy, intrapartum, and postpartum. This course uses a variety of teaching tools including lecture, discussion, case studies, and student research.

Botanicals III (BOT323q) 2 credit hours

Prerequisite: Botanicals II (BOT332q)
In this course, students will study specific herbs that are versatile and effective for a variety of conditions in women’s health and in midwifery applications. Students create treatment plans for “client” classmates using botanical medicine, modifying as necessary, and charting appropriately.

Botany (BTY121q) 2 credit hours

This is a fundamentals course that enhances a student’s plant medicine skills and knowledge. It covers basic botanical concepts, classification systems and nomenclature, plant identification, and constituents. Students will practice drawing and labeling plant specimens as well as finding and identifying plants in the field.

Breastfeeding Education and Counseling (BEC221q) 2 credit hours

Students will evaluate and develop tools for providing education and informed choice in a variety of settings, from one on one consultation appointments or phone support, to group breastfeeding classes, emphasizing active listening and assessment of client needs. This course uses a wide variety of activities including storytelling, art, role-plays, and videos.

Breastfeeding Politics and Policy (POL121q) 2 credit hours

This course covers a wide variety of U.S. and international breastfeeding initiatives and recommendations including WHO recommendations and implementation, WIC, and baby friendly initiatives. Students will also learn about the history of artificial feeding, social and cultural issues around breastfeeding, and ideas for being agents of change in the area of breastfeeding. This course integrates historical and contemporary topics, and both theory and action-oriented projects.

Breastfeeding Skills (BFS211q) 1 credit hour

This version of the course will only be taught in Spring 2016. It will be offered as a 2 credit course thereafter.
Pre or co-requisite: Introduction to Breastfeeding Theory (BRF131q)
Students have an opportunity to develop their hands-on skills by working with nursing women and their babies to demonstrate breast exams, practice supporting a successful latch, and demonstrate how to use a variety of equipment.

Breastfeeding Skills (BFS221q) 2 credit hours

This version of the course will be offered beginning in Winter 2017.
Pre or co-requisite: Introduction to Breastfeeding Theory (BRF131q)
Students have an opportunity to develop their hands-on skills by working with nursing women and their babies to demonstrate breast exams, practice supporting a successful latch, and demonstrate how to use a variety of equipment.

Childbirth Education (CBE131q) 3 credit hours

This course emphasizes evaluating and developing a wide range of tools for providing education and informed choice in multiple settings, from prenatal appointments to group classes. This is an experiential course and uses many activities for learning including storytelling, art, dance, music, and videos.

Clinical Training Credits – Lactation (LCT211q) 1 credit

1 credit each can take multiple credits per term
Each LCTC includes 30 hours of student work. Students participate in a full range of clinical activities under the direct supervision of an approved IBCLC preceptor. Students will have opportunities to assess both maternal and infant needs (physically, emotionally, and psychosocially), develop and chart care plans, and provide education and answer questions for clients. Students may also participate in some basic office or professional practice work such as filling out records requests, setting appointments, and organizing or stocking supplies. At least 60% (18 hours) per credit of student hours must be earned doing direct client care. Each credit will be taught by an approved preceptor.

Clinical Training Credits – Midwifery (MCT311q) 1 credit

1 credit each can take multiple credits per term
Each MCTC includes 30 hours of student work. Students participate in a full range of clinical activities under the direct supervision of an approved Midwife preceptor. Over the course of a minimum of two years of clinical practice, students will have opportunities to provide the full scope of midwifery care in a supervised setting. Students will observe, assist, and eventually provide primary care for prenatal appointments, births, and postpartum care for both the mother and the newborn. Students will also provide well person gynecological care when appropriate. Students may also participate in some basic office or professional practice work such as filling out records requests, setting appointments, and organizing or stocking supplies. At least 75% (22.5 hours) per credit of student hours must be earned doing direct client care. Each credit will be taught by an approved preceptor.

Communications I (COM121q) 2 credit hours

The first course in the Communications series introduces the student to the workings of the brain through the study of Interpersonal Neurobiology and its effect on our communication patterns. Students will use the work of Non-Violent Communication to support the brain and the body through empathy and resonance. The emphasis in this first of three Communications classes is in creating compassion and self awareness while focusing on how we speak and listen to ourselves. This course is highly experiential to facilitate depth of learning and awareness of our own brains. Role plays are used in class with real life experiences chosen by the students with varying degrees of intensity.

Communications II (COM112q) 1 credit hour

Prerequisite: Communications I (COM121q) or Introduction to Communication for Lactation Consultants (ICL111q)
The second course in the Communication series continues with skill-building from Communications I using aspects of the clinical experience as a resource of examples. Students will have opportunities  to deepen understanding of their own brains and how their attachment histories and relationships impact communication with clients and preceptors. Students also begin to identify the impact of the client’s attachment history and ways to help them feel safe in potentially intense experiences of birth, breastfeeding, and parenting

Communications III (COM113q) 1 credit hour

Prerequisite: Communications II (COM112q).
The final course in the Communication series will synthesize the skills from I and II and integrate the students’ previous learning with emphasis on how to communicate effectively with peers and other health care providers. Tools from previous courses will be used to prepare for and practice dialogues to resolve conflicts.

Complex Situations I* (CPX341q) 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Intrapartum (INT251q), Fetal Assessment (FET221q).
Using lecture, discussion, and case studies, this course focuses on complicated maternity situations often assessed and managed in the prenatal period. It covers anemia, clotting issues (thrombophilias, deficiencies, DIC), respiratory issues (asthma, amniotic fluid embolism, pulmonary embolism), energy issues (diabetes, hypoglycemia, eating disorders), liver problems (HELLP, acute fatty liver, intrahepatic cholestasis (ICP)), sepsis, and dermatologic conditions (PUPPP, HG).

Complex Situations II* (CPX442q) 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: Intrapartum (INT251q), Fetal Assessment (FET221q).
Using lecture, discussion, and case studies this course covers a variety of complex situations that might arise in midwifery scope of practice, including thyroid issues, premature rupture of membranes (PROM), postdates and postmaturity, vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC), multiple gestation, GBS, and unusual presentations (breech, face, brow, compound).

Complex Situations III* (CPX433q) 3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Postpartum (PTM251q)
This course incorporates guest lectures and student presentations to address unusual midwifery situations focusing on the infant, including preterm birth and infant anomalies. In addition, students will develop guidelines for dealing with emergency transport, death and grief, and self care.

Critical Care Skills I* (CCS411q) 1 credit hour

Prerequisite: Hematology Skills (HEM311q)
Students cover both the theory and skills involved in the treatment of shock and neonatal resuscitation. Skills covered in this course include basic and intermediate treatment of shock, IV, and neonatal resuscitation. This course meets Legend Drugs and Devices initial education requirements for treatment of shock and for neonatal resuscitation for Oregon midwifery licensing.

Critical Care Skills II* (CCS412q) 1 credit hour

Prerequisite: Critical Care Skills I (CCS421q)
Skills covered in this course include maternal resuscitation and continued practice of I.V. Skills. This course meets Legend Drugs and Devices initial education requirements for treatment of shock and for adult and infant CPR for Oregon midwifery licensing.

Critical Care Skills III* (CCS413q) 1 credit hour

Prerequisite: Critical Care Skills II (CCS412q)
Using role play scenarios and skills practice, this course demonstrates new IV site locations, site selection, and administration for locked IVs. Students will also practice scenarios of more complicated skills, such as facilitating transport in case of cord compression, using models and peers. In combination with Pharmacology, this course meets Legend Drugs and Devices initial education requirements for prophylactic administration of antibiotics for GBS for Oregon midwifery licensing.

Differential Diagnosis* (DIF431q) 3 credit hours

Prerequisites: All midwifery core courses and Fetal Assessment (FET211q) must be complete or in progress
Strongly recommend: Human Genetics (GEN231q), and Breastfeeding II (BRF222q) or Introduction to Breastfeeding Theory(BRF131q)
This is a capstone course. Using student created Signs and Symptoms book and protocols, students present case studies for differential diagnosis by their classmates. Students also create practice guidelines for antepartum, intrapartum, maternal postpartum, and infant care, as well as develop risk assessment guidelines and client care checklists.

Ethics (ETH321q) 2 credit hours

This course includes a survey of philosophical foundations and contemporary ethical models. Students will explore problem solving of ethical dilemmas that may occur in a midwifery practice. Some topics include autonomy and informed choice, relationships, and justice.

Exploring Spirituality in the Perinatal Period (ESP221q) 2 credit hours

This course will explore the physical and spiritual aspects of the human journey especially as it relates to pregnancy, birth, breastfeeding, and the postpartum period. Philosophical and theological concepts of natality, embodiment, and interconnection will be introduced. Lecture, role-play, self-reflections, and meditation and mindfulness practices, among other tools, will be used to enhance the students’ application of holistic care for themselves and the families they serve in the perinatal period.

Fetal Assessment* (FET221q) 2 credit hours

Co-requisite: Intrapartum (INT251q), Prenatal Skills (PRE211q)
This course covers methods for evaluating fetal well-being, including monitoring and analyzing fetal heart tones using a doppler or fetascope, fetal movement counts, sonogram, Auscultated Acceleration Test (AAT), the Non-Stress Test (NST), the Biophysical Profile (BPP), Amniotic Fluid Index (AFI), and other methods.

Gynecology Skills* (GYN321q) 2 credit hours

Prerequisite: Physical Assessment I (PHY221q)
Pre or Co-requisite: Well-woman Gynecology (GYN341q)
Students are required to have been a member of the cohort currently completing this course for at least one year or by special permission.
Using standardized patients and peer models, student practice bimanual and speculum exams, Paps, cultures, diaphragm fittings, pelvimetry, breast exams, bladder catheterization, and wet mounts.

Hematology Skills* (HEM311q) 1 credit hour

This course covers a variety of lab skills used to draw and assess blood. Skills covered include hemoglobin, hematocrit, and glucose evaluations with in-office devices. Students also learn venipuncture skills, including vacutainer, syringe, and butterfly devices, then move on to review treatment of shock theory and begin to practice IV skills on a mannequin.

Homeopathy (HOM131q) 3 credit hours

An introduction to the concepts and laws of homeopathy, focusing on the use of homeopathic medicine in first aid and midwifery. This course explores the theories of homeopathy, introducing the use of the repertory and constitutional prescribing. Students will examine key remedies, analyze a number of cases in class, and work together to make appropriate prescriptions. We highly recommend that students complete our Introduction To Healing Systems course before taking this course.

Human Genetics (GEN231q) 3 credit hours

Using class discussions, lecture, videos, role-playing and small group activities, this course covers basic genetic concepts, genetic screening and diagnosis, pregnancy counseling, and common genetic disorders such as sickle cell, Tay-Sachs, and Trisomy disorders.

Independent Study (TBD) 1-3 credit hours.

Student led independent research with an approved faculty member. Students interested in pursuing an Independent Study must initially complete an Intent Form designating the proposed topic, advisor, and credit value. Please meet with the Academic Coordinator or the Faculty Coordinator for more information. Allow seven weeks prior to the term in which you will pursue the Independent Study to complete all preparatory steps. Course number will be determined by the Academic Coordinator based on rigor and amount of work.

Infancy (INF121q) 2 credit hours

From an ethnopediatric perspective, this course covers newborn behavior, development, bonding and attachment, and childrearing including attachment parenting. This course uses a variety of learning activities, including lecture, group discussion, in-class writing assignments, quizzes, videos, audio excerpts, and presentations to help students explore the socio-cultural aspects of infancy and early parenting.

Infant Complex Breastfeeding Situations (ICS221q) 2 credit hours

Prerequisite: Advanced Breastfeeding Theory (BRF212q)
Midwifery students only: Enrolled midwifery students may waive the Advanced Breastfeeding Theory prerequisite if they have completed Introduction to Breastfeeding Theory (BRF131) and Postpartum (PTM251q).
This course covers an array of more complicated lactation support scenarios including: cleft-lip and palate; genetic syndromes such as Down Syndrome; screened disorders such as phenylketonuria; hypoglycemia; failure to thrive; hospitalization/surgery; infection; prematurity; multiples; pathological jaundice; birth injuries; gastrointestinal disorders such as true reflux; allergies; attachment disorders; and adoption. Students will develop a number of practice materials.

Information Literacy (INL111q) 1 credit hour

This course explores how to obtain, evaluate, use, and cite information, and how one can best base decisions on validated information. Students will learn how to recognize when they need information, and how to find information efficiently and effectively, using appropriate research tools and search strategies. Students will also evaluate and select information using appropriate criteria, and review research techniques such as treating research as a multistage learning process, ethically and legally using information and information technologies, and assessing how information relates to professional decision-making and writing papers.

International Midwifery (INT211q) 1 credit hour

Students will explore midwifery abroad from developing countries to other industrialized states. This course examines legal, health, social, economic, and political topics. Students will have opportunities to research the maternal and child health issues in a number of different international settings, as well as to explore some birth and parenting traditions practiced throughout the world.

Intrapartum* (INT251q) 5 credit hours

Prerequisite: Antepartum (ANT251q).
Co-requisite: Fetal Assessment (FET221q), Prenatal Skills (PRE211q).
Using lecture, discussion, and audio-visual aids, we cover the psychophysiology of labor and birth; Biodynamic facilitation of first, second, third, and fourth stages; unusual situations including precipitous birth, cord prolapse, nuchal cord, back labor, abruption, previa, hemorrhage, and third stage issues.

Introduction to Breastfeeding Theory (BRF131q) 3 credit hours

This course replaces Breastfeeding I (BRF111q) and Breastfeeding II (BRF222q).
Using lecture, discussion, visual aids, and small group activities, this course provides students with basic information about normal breastfeeding physiology of mother and baby, properties of human milk, risks of formula feeding, recommendations regarding breastfeeding initiation, duration and normal parameters of nursing in the first two weeks, politics of breastfeeding, and influences of culture and birth practices on breastfeeding. Students will also have opportunities to utilize case studies and research projects to develop skills such as how to take a breastfeeding history of mother and baby, identification of presenting problems, and integrating counseling and education strategies into their breastfeeding support.

Introduction to Communication for Lactation Consultants (ICL111q) 1 credit hour

This course introduces students to the workings of the brain through the study of Interpersonal Neurobiology and its effect on our communication patterns. Using the work of Non-Violent Communication to support the brain and the body through empathy and resonance, students will practice creating compassion and self-awareness while focusing on how we speak and listen to ourselves, our clients, and our colleagues. Geared toward lactation professionals, this course is highly experiential to facilitate depth of learning and awareness of our own brains. Role plays are used in class with real life experiences chosen by the students with varying degrees of intensity.

Introduction to Healing Systems (STM121q) 2 credit hours

How do people understand health and disease? This course is an introduction to seven systems of health and healing used in the world today, and the strengths and weaknesses of each system. Systems reviewed include: Allopathic/biomedicine, naturopathic medicine, plant medicine, homeopathy, classical Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, and osteopathic/chiropractic medicine.

Lactation Consultant Practice Protocols (LPP211q) 1 credit hour

Prerequisite: All Lactation Program courses must be completed or in progress.
A capstone course in which students review, update, and compile their protocols, informed choice agreements and, info sheets. Students will also use these practice materials during in-class role play scenarios to assess their effectiveness and then have opportunities to update them.

Massage Skills for Perinatal Practitioners (MSP121q) 2 credit hours

This course is both an introduction to the psychology of touch and an opportunity to practice a variety of therapeutic touch techniques. Students learn basic massage techniques with an emphasis on pregnancy and postpartum.

Maternal Complex Breastfeeding Situations (MCS221q) 2 credit hours

Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology for Birth and Lactation Professionals (ANP151q) or equivalent, Advanced Breastfeeding Theory (BRF212q)
Midwifery students only: Enrolled midwifery students may waive the Advanced Breastfeeding Theory prerequisite if they have completed Introduction to Breastfeeding (BRF131q) and Postpartum (PTM251q).
This course covers a variety of more complicated physiologic scenarios for mother including: breast surgery (reductions, enlargements and cancer); nipple issues (flat, inverted etc.); genetic disorders; Cesarean birth; milk production; and drug interactions. In addition, it covers psychosocial issues, such as socioeconomic issues, literacy issues, social support (lack thereof), teen moms, cultural issues in US, grief, family transition, tandem nursing, anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders, and Perinatal Mood Disorders.

Medical Terminology (MED111q) 1 credit hours

Dissecting medical terms into recognizable word parts, students decipher what can be an intimidating language, in order to chart appropriately and communicate with other medical professionals. This class is an overview of anatomy, physiology, and pathology, focusing on the language of A&P. Lectures weave in related stories of pregnant women and babies, individual presentations, while a few games spice up the memorization. This course meets Midwifery Program prerequisite requirements.

Microbiology Skills* (MIC311q) 1 credit hours

Co-requisite: Applied Microbiology for Midwives (AMM351q).
This course introduces students to the use of microscopes (both monocular and binocular). Students will have opportunities to view prepared slides, prepare their own wet mounts, incubate samples, practice staining, and use a variety of culture media. Students will also be introduced to and perform sterilization techniques.

Midwifery History and Politics (MHP431q) 3 credit hours

This course focuses on attitudes and laws that have surrounded midwives and the practice of midwifery throughout history and contemporary times. Students examine the role of midwives from ancient to modern times in Western Civilization. About equally divided between history and politics, the latter half of the class emphasizes the politics of midwifery in the United States, identifying important midwifery organizations and how midwives have come together to bring about change.

Midwifery Integration* (MIN411q) 1 credit hour

Prerequisite: All required midwifery program courses must be completed or in progress.
It is strongly suggested that students have prior clinical experience and have begun attending births as a primary under supervision before registering for this course.
In this capstone course, students use their practice guidelines, protocols, forms, information sheets, informed choice forms, and other information to manage practice scenarios with a standardized patient. Students will have opportunities to be both an assistant and primary midwife in at least one scenario and to receive and offer feedback on these scenarios.

Nutrition (NUT131q) 3 credit hours

This course covers nutrition fundamentals, emphasizing nutritional needs for pregnancy and lactation. Students will review nutrition concepts including macro- and micro-nutrients, use of supplements, diet analysis and nutritional counseling, and applications for pregnancy and postpartum.

Perinatal Psychology for Lactation Professionals (PSL211q) 1 credit hour

This course explores the transitional stages of the family life cycle; the transformational shift of identity into motherhood; the personal and cultural pressures associated with breastfeeding; the psychological impact of the birth experience on the postpartum; fears common to new parents; and the impact of parenthood on the family.

Perinatal Psychology for Midwives (PSY221q) 2 credit hours

This course explores the psychological tasks associated with the childbearing year, such as shifts in personal identity, working with pregnancy dreams, prenatal depression and anxiety, working with client fears, the psychological impact of the birth experience, the importance of the “birth story,” working with birth trauma and postpartum depression, changes in the couple relationship, and some of the psychological challenges that midwives may face.

Pharmacology (PHR421q) 2 credit hours

Prerequisites: Critical Care Skills I (CCS411q), Complex Situations II (CPX442q)
Registration for this course limited to midwifery program students, midwives, and approved community students.
This course covers basic pharmacology theory, legend drugs and devices used in a midwifery practice, and administration of medications including injection techniques. In combination with CCSIII, this course meets the Legend Drugs and Devices initial education requirements for Pharmacology, Medications by Injection, and intrapartum prophylactic antibiotics for GBS required for Oregon midwifery licensure.

Physical Assessment I* (PHY221q) 2 credit hours

Co-requisite: Antepartum (ANT251q).
Students learn the basics of universal precautions and safe touch, and then move on to practice hands-on skills including vital signs, SOAP charting, head-to-toe physical assessment (excluding breast, neurological, and reproductive exams which will be covered in other courses). Students will practice these skills on peer models.

Physical Assessment II* (PHY312q) 1 credit hour

Prerequisite: Physical Assessment I (PHY221q).
The second course in the Physical Assessment sequence expands students’ skills through deepening knowledge of neurological assessments. Students will choose appropriate physical assessments in case-specific scenarios to provide differential diagnosis. Students will also chart the results of their examinations.

Plant Medicine I (PLM221q) 2 credit hours

This course covers techniques for utilizing plants in health care including identifying and harvesting herbs; engaging in hands-on preparation of teas (infusions and decoctions) and tinctures using both scientific and folk methods; glycerites; and vinegars. Students begin to build a plant monograph book – choosing a specific plant to study and sharing information with each other. Includes an herb walk and field trip. We highly recommend that you complete our Introduction to Healing Systems course before taking Plant Medicine I.

Plant Medicine II (PLM222q) 2 credit hours

Prerequisite: Plant Medicine I (PLM221q).
Students expand their knowledge from Plant Medicine I, learning about and making topical applications, preparation of herbal baths, hydrosols, succi, salves, and creams. They add to their plant monographs and enhance their plant identification skills through in class activities and a field trip.

Plant Medicine III (PLM223q) 2 credit hours

Prerequisite: Plant Medicine II (PLM222q).
Student make more complicated or less frequently used forms of medicine, such as syrups, cordials and elixirs, lozenges, suppositories, oxymels, and electuaries. In addition, students utilize their knowledge of plant actions and constituents to create herbal formulas and prescriptions. This course includes a field trip.

Postpartum Skills* (PTM211q) 1 credit hour

Co-requisite: Postpartum (PTM251q).
Students learn about the steps of the newborn physical and gestational age exams and evaluation and practice these skills on mannequins. They also practice the use of growth charts and infant scales, estimate blood-loss using synthetic blood, examine placentas, draw cord blood, and practice various forms of cord clamping and cutting. Setting up and cleaning various types of water-birth tubs are also covered.

Postpartum* (PTM251q) 5 credit hours

Prerequisites: Intrapartum (INT251q).
Co-requisite: Postpartum Skills (PTM211q).
This course covers unique fetal anatomy and physiology, fetal transformation, newborn examination and age assessment. In addition, students learn neonatal procedures; behavioral states; infant postpartum assessment, care and complications; maternal assessment and care; maternal postpartum complications; and postpartum emotional disorders.

Pregnancy and Birth Impacts on Breastfeeding (IMP231q) 3 credit hours

This course examines in greater detail the effects of pregnancy and birth on breastfeeding, specifically looking at the anatomy and physiology of fetal development, maternal health and its effect on the fetus, the fetal environment, and the impact of all this on breastfeeding. In addition, students will examine the impact of Biodynamic birth with emphasis on baby or mother led initiation of breastfeeding (as opposed to practitioner led) in the immediate postpartum, and the impact of birth related interventions on breastfeeding (including drug impacts, cesarean birth, and instrumental delivery).

Prenatal Skills* (PRE211q) 1 credit hour

Prerequisites: Antepartum (ANT251q), Physical Assessment I (PHY221q)
Co-requisite Intrapartum (INT251q), Fetal Assessment (FET221q)
This is a hands-on class in which students will practice on volunteer models. Students learn to do full prenatal exams on pregnant models, including skills such as Leopold’s maneuvers, fetal auscultation using both doppler and fetoscope, and fundal height measurement. Other skills include gloving and ungloving, sterile technique, diastasis recti assessment, and rebozo use in pregnancy. Highly interactive.

Professional Standards and Practice for Lactation Consultants (LPS221q) 2 credit hours

Prerequisite: Advanced Breastfeeding Theory (BRF212q)
This course discusses professional ethics; business issues such as self employment topics, record keeping, and insurance; credentialing; HIPAA; and professional organizations for Lactation Consultants.

Psychosocial Issues* (PSY441q) 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: First year midwifery Core theory
Using lecture, discussion, guest speakers, and student presentations, this course covers social issues as they impact on clinical care, including socioeconomic status, literacy, family structures, sexual orientation, sexual abuse, domestic violence, adolescent pregnancy, and adoption.

Research Methods* (RSM311q) 1 credit hour

Prerequisite: Information Literacy (INL111q) and Using Medical Literature (UML111q)
Students will walk through the research process, from choosing a topic, to doing a review of the literature and creating original research tools. Students will also develop a thesis statement and practice using their research tools with other students in the class. Students may be able to use the work they begin in this course to inform their Research Projects.

Research Project* (RSP411q) 1 credit hour

Prerequisite: Research Methods (RSM311q).
Registration for this course is limited to midwifery program students.
This course focuses on the design and implementation of a research project, including definition of a topic, literature review, creation of a bibliography ,and the production of a research paper.

Running a Midwifery Practice* (RUN331q) 3 credit hours

This course explores developing and structuring a practice, including deciding which products and services to offer. Covers business management and bookkeeping, informed consent, malpractice, legal concepts and requirements. Also includes getting reimbursed, working with insurance companies and HIPAA compliance. Students produce a complete Business Plan and a community resource tool.

Spanish for Birth Professionals (SPA111q) 1 credit hour

This course offers students an introduction to basic vocabulary and phrasing related to the perinatal period. Students watch videos and practice speaking and reading so that all aspects of language development are used.

Suturing (SUT421q) 2 credit hours

Prerequisite: Postpartum (PTM251q)
Registration for this course is limited to midwifery program students, midwives, and approved community students.
This course covers both theory and skills behind the assessment of perineal lacerations and the necessary steps for repairing them. Skills include materials and equipment selection, perineal evaluation, repairs of first and second degree lacerations, use of local anesthetics, and episiotomy. This course meets Legend Drugs and Devices initial educational requirements for Suturing required for Oregon licensure.

Using Medical Literature (UML111q) 1 credit hour

Students will gain skills in evaluating, analyzing, applying, and making meaning of the information they encounter in scientific literature both as a student and as a practitioner. Basic statistical and epidemiological concepts will be covered such as direct and indirect causes of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity, principles of research, evidence-based practice, critical interpretation of professional literature, and the interpretation of vital statistics and research findings. Students will use homebirth safety studies to evaluate both the research itself as well as the benefits and risks of available birth settings.

Well-woman Gynecology* (GYN341q) 4 credit hours

Co-requisite: Gynecology Skills (GYN321q)
This theory course explores sexuality, birth control and family planning, pelvic examinations, breast health and examinations. Other topics covered include menstrual disorders, perimenopause and menopause, uterine and cervical abnormalities, and myomata.

Working Cross Culturally (WCC221q) 2 credit hours

This course uses lecture, discussion, guest speakers, and student presentations to cover the general principles of cultural versatility and humility when working with someone from a different culture. Additionally, students will explore a wide range of cultural beliefs and practices regarding the childbearing year.